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PRESIDENT

Scott Curtis (2015)
Department of Radio-Television-Film
Northwestern University
1920 Campus Drive
Evanston, IL 60208
USA
tel: 847.491.2249
email: scurtis@northwestern.edu

SECRETARIES

Philippe Gauthier (Canada) (2014)
Tami Williams (USA) (2015)
email: domitorsecretary@gmail.com

TREASURER

Kaveh Askari
English Department 9055
Western Washington University
516 High Street
Bellingham, WA 98225-9055
USA
email: ktaskari@gmail.com

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Teresa Castro (France) (2015)
email: teresa.castro@univ-paris3.fr

Matthew Solomon (USA) (2015)
email: mpsolo@umich.edu

Gregory Waller (USA) (2014)
email: gwaller@indiana.edu

Artemis Willis (USA) (2017)
email: abwillis@uchicago.edu

Joshua Yumibe (USA) (2015)
email: jy20@st-andrews.ac.uk

Full Biographies

PRESIDENT

Scott Curtis is Associate Professor of Radio/Television/Film at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, USA. His areas of expertise include early German cinema and the early institutional appropriation of motion pictures, such as educational filmmaking or the use of moving image technology as a scientific research tool or diagnostic instrument. He has published on a wide variety of topics, including early film theory; film sound; animation; Alfred Hitchcock; Douglas Fairbanks; the Motion Picture Patents Company; industrial film; and the scientific use of motion pictures, such as medical cinematography and microcinematography. His essays have appeared in numerous anthologies and such journals as Film History, Cinema et Cie, montage/av, Science in Context, and Zeitschrift für Medienwissenschaft.

SECRETARIES

Philippe Gauthier is a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard University. His doctoral work focused on film historiography. He is particularly interested in editing in early cinema (Cinéma & Cie and The Griffith Project Vol. 12 with André Gaudreault) and is the author of a book on this subject: Le montage alterné avant Griffith. Le cas Pathé (L'Harmattan, 2008). An updated English version of this book will be published in 2012 by Columbia University Press, in collaboration with André Gaudreault. His articles have been published in French, English, German and Portuguese. He has published several essays on early cinema in Film History: An International Journal (2009), International Journal of Comic Art (2010), Journal of Early Popular Visual Culture (forthcoming), 1895 – Revue d'histoire du cinéma (forthcoming) and animation: an interdisciplinary journal (forthcoming). He received the Domitor Graduate Student Writing Award in 2008.

Tami M. Williams is an Assistant Professor of English and Film Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her forthcoming book, Invitation to a Voyage, examines the cinema of 1920s French feminist and avant-garde filmmaker Germaine Dulac, from aesthetics to politics. She has published articles and chapters in English, French, German, Greek, Italian, and Slovenian with 1895 (Paris), Cinéma et Cie (Bologna), Cinémathèque française (Paris), Ekran (Lubiana), Framework (N. America), Kinémathek (Frankfurt), and the Olympic Museum (Lausanne). She is currently working on the relationship between the wordless arts (modern pantomime, burlesque dance, symbolist theater) and early cinema, as well as between French impressionist film and contemporary global cinema.

TREASURER

Kaveh Askari received his PhD from the University of Chicago; he is currently Associate Professor of English at Western Washington University. His research and teaching interests include silent film, nineteenth-century visual culture, Iranian cinema, and experimental cinema. He has recently published articles on 1890s magic lantern performance and on Mesmerism in 1910s cinema. He is currently working on a study of the pictorial art tradition in American silent cinema and editing a special journal edition on early cinema in the Middle East.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Teresa Castro is Associate Professor of Film Studies at the University of Paris 3 – Sorbonne Nouvelle. Her research interests include visual culture problems from the end of the nineteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth century (panoramas, photography, cinema) and the history of early non-fiction film, as well as the relationships between cinema, archival images, and contemporary art. She has published a number of articles on Albert Kahn’s Archives de la Planète. Her book La Pensée cartographique des images. Cinéma et culture visuelle was published by Aléas, Lyon, in 2011.

Matthew Solomon is Associate Professor at the Department of Screen Arts and Cultures at the University of Michigan. He is interested in cinema’s relations to the popular and performing arts and has published on topics ranging from the origins of moving pictures to radio drama and Hollywood films of the forties. He is the author of Disappearing Tricks: Silent Film, Houdini, and the New Magic of the Twentieth Century (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2010) and the editor of Fantastic Voyages of the Cinematic Imagination: Georges Méliès’s Trip to the Moon (Albany: SUNY Press, 2011). He is currently working on a book about Méliès and modern visual culture.

Gregory Waller is Professor in the Department of Communication and Culture at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. His books include Main Street Amusements: Film and Commercial Entertainment in a Southern City, 1896-1930, which won the Theatre Library Association award and the Katherine Singer Kovacs award from the Society for Cinema Studies, and Moviegoing in America: A Sourcebook in the History of Film Exhibition. His current projects include Japan-in-America: The Turn of the Twentieth Century, a study of the representation of Japan in motion pictures and other commercial media in the United States, 1890-1915, and Adventures in 16mm, a history of 16mm and non-theatrical cinema in the 1930s-1940s, which includes a chapter on exhibition outside American movie theaters in the mid-1910s.

Artemis Willis is a graduate student in Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago, a media arts curator and a documentary filmmaker. Her doctoral work focuses on the international history, practice and aesthetics of the magic lantern. Her current research interests include stage-screen relations, the nonfiction tradition and reenactment. She has organized film series, tributes, lantern shows and other projected performances at such institutions as the National Gallery of Art and Film Society of Lincoln Center. Her films have been presented by the MFA Boston, Anthology Film Archives and the Brooklyn Museum.

Joshua Yumibe holds a joint appointment as assistant professor and director of Film Studies at Michigan State University and as a lecturer of Film Studies at the University of St Andrews. His book on color in silent cinema, Moving Color: Early Film, Mass Culture, Modernism, has been published with Rutgers University Press in 2012. With Sarah Street, he is working on the Leverhulme Trust funded project, Color in the 1920s: Cinema and Its Intermedial Contexts, and since 2003, he has been the Project Co-Director of the Davide Turconi Project at George Eastman House.